Planned Burns – Mt Arapiles & Grampians National Park

Some of these burns may impact your climbing plans. Info below and maps available for download. Register for the planned burn notification system if you want to be kept up to date. Sometimes burns will occur when a perfect weather window appears which doesn’t always give you much notice.

Planned Burns this Autumn at Mt Arapiles. See info below. Dates haven’t been announced yet but as of yesterday, there won’t be any done in the next 7-10 days at least, due to unsuitable weather conditions. Date will be announced when known.

Download here:

1 Fact Sheet_Mt Arapiles_Autumn2017

2 Community Map_Plan Burning Autumn 2017_Mt. Arapiles -Tooan State Park

Planned Burns in the Grampians National Park for this Autumn

Following is info provided:
A number of burns have been scheduled across the Grampians National Park, please see the map attached. These are planned for the Autumn months but FFMVic work closely with the Bureau of Meteorology to assess suitable weather conditions and burning will only go ahead when the weather conditions are suitable. Plans will often change at short notice.

Planned burning in the Grampians National Park is scheduled to take place this year predominately after the Easter School holidays, apart from the Grampians – Jimmy Creek Fuel Reduction Burn which may be actioned earlier to take advantage of favourable conditions. This burn however will result in very few impacts to visitors with no walking track closures, no impacts to visitor sites & limited road closures.

There are many ways to find out where planned burns are happening in your area. You can sign up online by searching for the Planned Burn Notification System (PBNS), which you can customise to suit your notification needs, or contact the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226.  Alternatively you can contact the Horsham DELWP office on 03 5362 0720.

Prior to any burning, notifications will be sent to land holders and stakeholders in the area.  Burn notification signs will be placed around the park and community engagement staff will be available for questions and feedback from the community.

Should you have any further queries do not hesitate to contact DELWP Horsham on 5362 0720.

Grampians CE Map

Download here:

Grampians CE Map

https://www.ffm.vic.gov.au/bushfire-fuel-and-risk-management/planned-burns/planned-burning-notification-system

Access & Environment Report April 2017

Drones. Love them or hate them. Love them for their ability to provide some amazing video perspectives. And we have all, oohed and aahed over amazing climbing footage. Hate them for – well, there appears to be a variety of reasons as to why people/climbers hate them. The main one seems to be that they are extremely noisy and invasive. And the privacy factor is also high on the scale. A sure fire way to ruin some quiet enjoyment at the cliff . For those of you who have had the opportunity to have a drone hang around you or nearby whilst leading up a route, will more than likely attest to the fact that it’s not something you can ignore. And more than likely attest to the fact that it pissed you off .

Regardless of personal opinions, the reality of drones in parks is becoming more prevalent as they become more affordable for the general public. Which means that the rules on drones and their usage in parks starts to come into play. These rules – which are highlighted in the poster below – have been in place for quite a while but like lots of issues that have rules attached to them (and there are many) they often won’t see the light of day until it becomes…….an issue. And here we are.

Early days yet, but already there have been unpleasant murmurings from some in the climbing community about the use of drones. And from my interaction with various people – not many are aware that in fact, you can’t just buy a drone and go fly it. As opposed to kites. And certainly not go fly it in parks.

So in the interests of good climber discussion, which is always much better than abusive climber discussion – be aware.

For those who have a professional interest, my advice would be to get the permit and make note at the park, via social media etc that you will be fiming and in what general area. Possibly that way, people can organize their climbing for the day and there will be less pissed off people.

I foresee that there will be more discussions on this via land managers, park users and drone operators. If you have something to say about it – drop me a line
cliffcare@vicclimb.org.au

NOTE: THE POSTER BELOW HIGHLIGHTS MT ARAPILES TOOAN STATE PARK BUT THIS IS ALSO INDICATIVE OF ALL NATIONAL /STATE PARKS.

Arapiles DroneUsageSign

Arapiles Rescue Locations

Zoe Wilkinson who is the Area Chief Ranger Wimmera and who is a climber herself, recently put together this article to explain the new Rescue locations system that has been put in place at Mt Arapiles. Whilst we hope of course that this doesn’t have to be used, the reality is that at some point an accident will happen, and knowing the best way to report this can save vital time when it comes to emergency services accessing the injured. Climbers might know where an area is, but expecting emergency services to, without any point of reference is a tricky one. Arapiles now has it’s own system that relates to climbs and staging points rather than the standard Emergency markers that are at many other parks and coastal areas. Take the time to acquaint yourself and then print off a copy. And pass it on.

Arapiles rescue reporting and locations

Improving emergency response

Rock climbing accidents
at
Mount Arapiles-Tooan State Park

by Zoe Wilkinson – Climber, VCC Member and Parks Victoria Area Chief Ranger Wimmera

Do you know what to do if you have a climbing accident at Mount Arapiles that requires an ambulance and cliff rescue?

·       Call Triple Zero 000 – clearly stating the need for an Ambulance AND Cliff Rescue

·       Tell operator:

–        Accident location – Mount Arapiles-Tooan State Park

–        Name of the climb (For example:- Spellbinder),

–        Climbing Area Name (For example:- Pharos Gully Right Side)

–        If known, name of nearest vehicular access point (For example:- Pharos Gully Carpark)

·       If possible send someone to the nearest vehicular access point to meet and direct the paramedics and other responding emergency agencies. These may include SES, CFA, VicPolice and Parks Victoria.

 

The emergency response problem

Rock climbing accidents requiring an ambulance to Mount Arapiles are fortunately uncommon. When they occur, Triple Zero 000 operators are likely to ask for information to verify the location of the incident to guide the ambulance. This may include the names of the nearest road intersection, the co-ordinates of the incident if known, the name of the climb and the name of the climbing area (eg Pharos Gully).

This is the standard way that the operators at Triple Zero 000 (ESTA – The Emergency Services Telecommunications Authority) locate an incident. While effective for road traffic incidents, having the responding paramedic directed to the intersection of Summit Road and Centenary Park Road at Mount Arapiles is not going to be a great help in locating a climber having fallen off ‘Snow Blind’, for example, in the bottom of Yesterday Gully.

All too often the responding paramedics and emergency services providing cliff rescue have to drive around at Mount Arapiles until hopefully they come across the location of the accident or bump into someone who knows where the accident has happened. This is at best frustrating and at worst potentially a matter of life and death for the individual if they are suffering critical injuries.

Emergency Markers – Useful but not considered the best solution for Arapiles

Emergency Markers (managed by ESTA) with a code (see picture below) on them that link to co-ordinates back in the ESTA 000 databases are one response to this problem. You may have seen them in Melbourne, such as around the Botanic Gardens running track ‘The Tan’, or along the Victorian coast where they are used quite extensively. If someone collapses on ‘The Tan’ running track you simply quote the code of the nearest Emergency Marker to the operator when you call 000 and the ambulance will know exactly where to go. There is also an Emergency Marker at the Burnley Bouldering Wall in Richmond

A better solution – Using Climbing Area Names to guide rescue

Detailed location information already exists – the name of the climb and the climbing area itself, as listed in the commonly used rock climbing guide books and on online sites such as ‘The Crag’. Telling any climber who knows Mount Arapiles that there has been an accident up at ‘Beautiful Possibilities’ on ‘Central Gully Left Side’ is as good as giving them a precise GPS co-ordinate. The climber knows exactly where the nearest road access point is for the responding ambulance – at the top of the Pines – and how to get to the accident site from there. The challenge is conveying that knowledge, via the ESTA 000 centralised dispatch system, through to the paramedics and other responding agencies.

So Parks Victoria has been working on an innovative but common sense solution based on a good understanding of how climbers use Arapiles. The aim is to use existing climbing area names, to improve climbing accidents rescue response at Mount Arapiles-Tooan State Park. Co-ordinates and names for 57 climbing areas (For example:- Pinnacle Face, Left Watchtower Face, New Image Wall, The Organ Pipes ) and 13 nearest vehicular access points (officially called Rescue Staging Points, for example Pharos Gully Carpark – see Map) have now been collected and uploaded to the ESTA 000 database (as part of the state-wide Common Place Names geo-dataset).

All emergency response and rescue organisations – Victoria Police (who under the Emergency Management Act are legislatively in charge of all rescues in Victoria), Ambulance Victoria, the SES Horsham (which includes members of the former local Arapiles Rescue Group), CFA, ESTA (Triple Zero 000) and Parks Victoria – have been involved and informed about this process. Documentation and maps for incident management purposes have now been completed. Kieran Loughran (local climber and longstanding local rescue group member) has updated ‘The Crag’ (https://www.thecrag.com/climbing/australia/arapiles) to include a specific reference to the climbing area names that has been used in the ESTA Triple Zero 000 database (For example:- Emergency Location – Voodoo Area, Mount Arapiles). Maps and information for climbers on what to do in case of an accident have been made available on the new Visitor Information Boards and in the Toilet Block at Mount Arapiles.

The final step has been the installation at Mount Arapiles of normal low-key park signage (see below) clearly identifying the 13 nearest vehicular access points (Rescue Staging Points) for all 3000 climbs at all 57 climbing areas. The primary aim of these signs is to confirm the location for the responding paramedics and emergency agencies without being too intrusive. On a normal day to day basis the signs will help orientate visitors in the park.

Now the new system is in place, following the notification process at the beginning of this article should lead to a more informed response from emergency services. The next unfortunate climbing accident will test the system and hopefully benefit from improved emergency response times. We would like to be waiting a long time to test it.

ArapilesRescueStagingPointsMap

 

 

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Campfires at Arapiles – Keep it in the campground please.

 

Just another post on that old chestnut – campfires. It’s all been said before. CliffCare and Friends of Arapiles as well as many members of the climbing community are working together to try and get the information out there. This recent campfire was discovered last week at the Good Morning Arapiles boulder. Quite a large and recent campfire as well as a half burnt  log which  I can only assume was removed from the campfire at the end of the evening. Signage is at the campground. But best it be said again. Campfires at Mt Arapiles are:

  1. Only allowed in the actual campground.
  2. Only allowed in the campground and in the official metal fireplaces
  3. Only allowed between 1st May and 31st October. (No fires between 1st Nov & 30th April)
  4. Firewood collection is not allowed in the park.

Put a jacket on if you are cold.

Various reasons as to why – the main one being environmental impact. Especially so in an isolated park such as Mt Arapiles.  At this point in time, people are still allowed to have campfires, albeit in the campground. It would be great if this could continue but if the incidences of campfires around the park continues to grow, we could find ourselves out of luck.

There have been numerous posts on this. A couple that I can link to immediately:

https://cliffcare.org.au/2011/07/30/wood-fires-at-arapiles/

Camping fees at Victorian parks – Update

For all those wanting a little more info on the fees and online booking system being implemented on 1st July, please see here:

http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/visit/book-your-stay/changes-to-camping-and-accommodation-fees

fee sign

Camping fee and system changes at Victorian parks – 1st July 2014

Hi All,

I thought I should remind everyone that as of 1st July, 2014 the camping fee system which includes the new prices and the online booking for sites will be implemented. For Mt Arapiles Tooan State Park this means that you can no longer pay your fees via the fee box. You will need to book a site online.

Fees for Arapiles will continue to be $5 a night with campers free to choose where they wish to camp within the designated campground area, but you will need to do this online.

The signs have been installed and the fee box will be removed soon. See the pictures below.

As yet, I have no official communication to get you any further info. I will post this as soon as it comes to hand. If if people want to make direct enquiries or give feedback then either call 131963 or email info@parks.vic.gov.au

Here is the link to the DEPI which contains the original information http://www.depi.vic.gov.au/forestry-and-land-use/visiting-parks-and-forests/national-parks-camping-and-accommodation-fees

For other parks though, the fees won’t be staying the same. Hefty hikes. Online booking system will also be go for obtaining a camp site

The post which the original proposal https://cliffcare.org.au/2013/11/19/proposed-changes-to-camping-accommodation-fees-in-victorian-parks-please-have-your-say/

photofee sign

Access & Environment Officer report April 2014

 

p1040352As the hot weather draws to a close, it’s time to start organising the work days ahead for the year. I recently had a conversation with Walter Braun, our stonemason who has been working on the Pharos Gully at Arapiles.It was only last week, that for the first time he stood on the track where he was working and he could see the section where the downhill part of the track ends. The two ends are now both in sight and the weeks can be counted off as he draws closer to connecting them. At this stage he still has enough rock up there that he can work with as he is digging up quite a lot of useable stone so there will be no need for a working bee come this Easter. Walter will be giving me a heads up when it comes closer to needing some bodies to haul up rock from below. At least it will be cooler by then. I know many of you are hanging out for your yearly weight lifting session – don’t worry, I won’t disappoint and forget you all 🙂

So….what’s happening in the Grampians. It may not seem like much but there is work and discussions going on. The job and road ahead is massive and I am in constant contact with those at PV to see at what stage the works are and how the climbing community can be involved.
 I have to say the feedback and suggestions from many in the climbing community has been brilliant and all of these are taken on and has definitely informed many of the processes. While the work involved to manage the park after a major fire like the Northern Grampians and the previous Vic Range one, is extensive and time consuming, it has also meant that PV are able 
to look at the bigger picture when it comes to repairing and realigning visitor areas in the Grampians. Rather than just fix up things exactly as they may have been before, the closures and work involved enable them to reassess as to whether the original may have been the best option or it was merely a best at the time/situation. It is an opportunity to start afresh. Obviously this
is not just limited to the climbing aspect of the park – there are many user groups to consider as well as the conservation values of the park. This should give you some idea of the grand scale of works that need to be considered. I am with many of you when it comes to frustration at areas being closed for long periods of time. I am in the better position though to actually see and 
hear much of the work that is going on and is needed to get areas open again. Not forgetting of course that many of the areas are closed because they are environmental unstable and sensitive. For most in the climbing community out there, it must seem often like nothing is happening because all seems to be quiet on the western front. Believe me, the work is going on and bubbling away but the list is so very long. I have outlined a few points of discussion I have had recently with my PV contacts:
• Another site visit will be occurring soon to Summerday Valley. This will confirm the realignment of the access track in and the loop track within the valley. A quote on work costs has now been received by PV. After funding has been established work will start on these jobs. Summerday has an approximate closure time of a year in order for it to recover from the fire but in the meantime the work that needs to be done to make it accessible will be ongoing over the year. Previous to the fire, the VCC were successful with a grant to help harden up the Main Wall area. Around near Waxman, the ground was particularly eroded and suffering from the heavy traffic it receives. Dates will be organised soon to undertake this job – most likely towards mid/end of May. I will be confirming these dates shortly.
• Now that Mt Zero car park and Flat Rock are open, this has thrown up the issue of cliffs and crags in the vicinity being accessible. Unfortunately, this doesn’t mean that they should be accessed yet. Having said that though there are more than likely some cliffs which may be okay for climbing as they weren’t impacted by the fire much. I will be attending a site visit next week to help assess the general area and work out what cliffs will be good to access and those that need to stay on the closed list. The important thing to note here is that the closures relating to those cliffs that are deemed to be in a closed area, need to be respected. If certain cliffs are opened and lead the way towards other climbing areas, the concern is that many climbers will head off to the closed areas regardless. Signage has been noted to be lacking by many in the climbing community. While I personally don’t think that we should be littering every single closed and open track in the Grampians, there is definitely a need to temporarily highlight some of
the areas and tracks into climbing areas with climbing specific info. Respecting these closures goes a long way to showing that the climbing community is onboard when it comes to looking after the park.
• The current closure to the Emu Foot Track (Jananginjawi) still stands and it is important that climbers respect this by only walking into the cliffs accessed along it. Cars must
 be parked outside of the gate. I recently reported that due to feedback from sections of the climbing community, that PV were willing to look at the situation again and see whether something a little more conducive to climbers accessing the cliffs may be found. To confirm – this is still on the table but like many things, it is not simply a matter of one person saying yay and then all is well. As I noted, this decision was one that involved Aboriginal Affairs and local indigenous groups and was decided on before the fires. There is a process that needs to be undertaken, discussions had with a number of groups and then a suitable outcome reached. And to put it into perspective time wise, this doesn’t sit at the very top of the list of things to do – considering the recent fires and the amount of new work that has been generated because of it. The Vic Range is a sensitive area with sensitive issues and must be respected and handled accordingly. I say this with a strong reference to climbing and indeed any other recreational pursuit that occurs within this area. Be patient and we will work through any issues bit by bit. Safe climbing to all, Tracey