Access & Environment Report August 2018

Simple Equations

No-one can deny that the amount of people now heading into climbing and going outdoors has grown since the early heydays of climbing. And by that simple statement, I am sure that the majority of you can relate to the fact that as anything grows, its wants, needs, advancements and issues, grow along with it. Many codes of conduct, any operational guidelines or policies soon become outdated as the activity outgrows the very guidelines put in place to protect it or the space in which it exists.
In more recent months, some conversations around fixed protection and development in the Grampians has come to the fore. Some people are asking why? What’s the problem? Rather than outlining too much here, I will leave it up to the reader to read back over previous Access reports. It is all there.

Fixed protection is one element of the bigger picture. It is not the only one. We will need to deal with all.

The biggest issue though that has an overall impact on all of the issues we need to deal with, whether it be environmental, cultural heritage or sharing the space with others, is growth. The amount of people now climbing, bouldering and accessing the outdoor option is growing and will continue to. Which means that the impact is much greater. How climbing was managed, or not managed previously, is no longer looking after the space and in the longer run, looking after the activity.

A complex conversation. There are land manager and traditional owner perspectives. There are climbing community ethics. There is the evolution of climbing and bouldering. And there are rules and regulations. The reality is all do change over time. Which means that we all need to reassess what works. It is something we do everyday in many aspects of our life and the world we live in. Especially if it’s due to growth. It’s why we re- assess our energy options, why we re-assess the way we package our food, our lives… The sheer volume has an impact.

Climbing/Bouldering is no different. That moment in time and the joy of being on rock both spiritually and physically, simply isn’t the only thing anymore that we have to think about. The sheer volume is having an impact and those impacts are relayed to me directly by those who are tasked with looking after the space, as well as those who also share it.
Victoria has a range of climbing areas across the state with the most heavily visited being the Grampians National Park and Arapiles Tooan State Park.

So why the current focus on the Grampians? Because at this moment in time the impacts via climbing and bouldering are growing and being relayed to me, as now no longer acceptable in the current state of play. So how do we manage this? There are so many questions and there will be many conversations moving into the future. So as a starter, some food for thought, some direction for conversations for the climbing community. On a rope. On a boulder. Or over a beer.

A few points of interest:

The bulk of cultural heritage ie indigenous art sites, sacred locations occur in the Grampians. The Victoria Range in particular has the highest percentage of all known and registered sites in the park. A large amount of these sites are also rock sites.

The majority of Indigenous cultural heritage sites that are known and registered are not known to the general public. It is against the law for Parks Victoria or anyone else with that information, to notify the public of their exact locations.

It is a National Park. It’s main aim is to conserve its natural and cultural values. Any recreational activities need to sit alongside these values but with minimal damage/loss to them. Impacts will differ from location to location

Climbing is a recognised activity in the park and one which is promoted. There are some areas within the park that are particularly sensitive for either cultural or environmental reasons and climbing amongst other activities, is not allowed.

The Grampians National Park is moving towards a Joint Management Plan whereby it will be managed by both Parks Victoria and Traditional Owners.

Land Manager and Traditional Owner Concerns – Grampians National Park

Direct impacts to cultural heritage sites

Route development in known areas of cultural heritage significance and therefore possible impacts to undiscovered sites

Environmental impact to surrounding cliff landscapes due to increased traffic. Excessive social trails especially in bouldering areas

Human waste issues at climbing/bouldering sites/bush camps

Increased use of fixed protection

Chalk impacts

Wire brushing

Vegetation removal to access climbing or bouldering sites or the actual routes

Current management plan boundaries not being followed

Questions & Actions – to ask yourself, your climbing friends, to ponder, to respond.

Climbing and Bouldering Route developers:
Check the park management plans. Understand the environmental and cultural heritage values of the park and the particular areas you are developing. Does the plan prohibit climbing in that area? Is there a high level of sensitive cultural heritage in the area. Rare flora or fauna in a threatened habitat?
Caves and overhangs often have a higher likelihood of cultural heritage. Bouldering development can impact a larger area either directly or indirectly with traffic and multiple social trails, within a location that contains a high percentage of sensitive sites.
Don’t know? Ask.

When using fixed protection:
Alongside the perspectives of land managers and park management plans, this brings up the topic of climbing ethics within the climbing community ie traditional and sport climbing. A complex and often divisive one. And a changing conversation as our sport has evolved. That fixed protection is an element of climbing is not denied, but how and when, is the conversation we will need to have. At this point in time, climbing in the Grampians (and Victoria) has operated on the understanding that if it goes at trad it should remain so. Fixed protection besides the physical impact, can increase the traffic to an area so this should be taken into account. The following points are some suggested already by members of the climbing community that might go some way towards helping to manage this one aspect in the future. Only a guide at this point but something to develop further.

Is the route you wish to bolt in a predominantly sport climbing area?

Is the route in a sensitive area be it cultural heritage or a fragile environmental landscape?

Is the route you wish to bolt naturally protectable?

Is the route visible from major tourist/public tracks or areas?

Do you have sufficient knowledge of and experience in placing fixed gear? Same as in the case of removing it.

If you are considering retro-bolting the route, do you have permission from the person (s) who made the FA?

As noted , climbing is a recognized activity in the park. We are working towards a joint understanding between all parties for a sustainable climbing future. There will be many conversations like this. Throw this info around in your head. Ask the questions in your groups. Your help via feedback, support for closures that may be in place and a little extra care when developing or out climbing or bouldering, can and will make a difference. Any thoughts on this you want to send me? I am very keen to hear. Drop me a line. Any other way you think you can help, maybe a particular issue you feel passionate about – there are always jobs. Drop me a line.

Many thanks to all the people from the many different avenues of our climbing community who have taken the time to provide their thoughts, be it publicly or privately. It all goes into the pot.

Tracey Skinner
VCC Access & Environment Officer

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Impact – Here, There and Everywhere

While the conversation about impacts from climbing and bouldering is always one of the key topics that guides the work that CliffCare does and always will, now more than ever, we need to be open to solutions that will not only conserve the areas we climb and boulder at but in the long run also help to protect what we do. We impact. No denying that. How do we manage it?

Some timely reading. This is on bouldering but the same conversation can be had about roped climbing. Elsewhere in the world – These are all the same issues we are facing now and more so heading into the future. Throw the conversation around in your head and in your circles. https://www.theprojectmagazine.com/features/2018/7/27/magicwoodsconservation

Access & Environment Report December 2017

Last Access officer report for the year.
Discussions are still ongoing with regards to the Black Range issues. As I noted in previous reports, this has thrown the discussion much wider than just the Black Range. Cultural heritage and how climbing may impact sites, is firmly on the table. This throws up many questions without as yet, answers. These questions are not just limited to climbing but obviously our focus is trying to provide some answers and sustainable options for climbing to co-exist with cultural heritage in the parks. And the Grampians is the top of the list when it comes to climbing and bouldering sites. And top of the list when it comes to cultural heritage. Especially around rock sites. As the sport of climbing and bouldering becomes more and more popular, the growth of gyms in the city increases and the push to get more people outdoors enjoying recreational pursuits – one of the biggest questions is ‘With rock a finite source, and climbers an infinite source, how do we manage this?’ For some, on either side of the table, maybe the answers are very simple – stop the recreational activity and on the other side continue the recreational activity as always. These are both the easiest options in many ways, but neither of them are fair nor sustainable in the long term. The middle ground or somewhere thereabouts is where we need to get to but this won’t be easy. There are a myriad of other queries and issues within the bigger question and these all need to be discussed. In the new year, I am aiming to ramp up these discussions and to get the climbing community asking themselves the harder questions. And coming up with some solutions that are agreeable to the majority.

One of my difficulties with this, is capturing feedback and collating it, and on some kind of platform that requires minimal management. There are numerous avenues such as CliffCare website, Chockstone, Facebook, theCrag that I visit regularly to gather info from the climbing community. But this can be very time consuming and fragmented. Any suggestions as to a platform that could work better in order to present topics and discussion on this subject to the wider climbing community would be great.
In the meantime, throw the question around in your head, discuss with your fellow climbers and come up with some starting point thoughts.
This Parks Victoria community update just arrived with some words on the issue GNP Community Update December 2017

Plenty Gorge Draft Master Plan is now out for community feedback. We have been in communication with Parks Victoria since the beginning of this and it’s good to see that climbing is to be considered. The particular area where climbing used to occur was under private hands and it was eventually banned by the private landowner. It is currently in the process of being handed back, to once again be public land. Once this has officially taken place, we will be able to engage in proper discussion with PV.  It would be great if people from the climbing community provide some feedback on this. The link for feedback is below. The area is Middle Gorge. Any positive words with regards to including climbing in the future of the park once acquisition is in hand, would be great. And for those that are into mountain biking, this is also a good chance to be involved in the future of the park.
http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/plenty-gorge-park/plans-and-projects/plenty-gorge-park-master-plan

The photos below show a few moments in the last 2 working bees in Central Gully, Mt Arapiles. Great progress being made getting a decent pile of rocks down the track for Walter to work on. One more working bee to go before the end of the year. This next one is being run in conjunction with a trip so check out the VCC trip calendar if you are wanting to join the trip. Otherwise drop me a line or just rock up. 9.30am 16th December. Meet at the top of Central Gully. Wear closed toe shoes and bring water. Simple as! Think of it as a big Christmas present to the Mount.
Great work all and many thanks for your support in Access work. See you all in the new year.
Tracey Skinner – VCC Access & Environment Officer.

This below wasn’t included in my report for Argus but was in Argus as a small photo essay from Michael O’Reilly on the memorial bench that was burnt in the Northern Grampians fires and it’s replacement. A thoughtful piece that not only shows the bench and plaque replacement for the climber who died at Summerday but also the new growth of the bush. Kind of works well together and I thought it worth showing.

 

Grampians Flood Update 16 Sept

Latest update from PV. Park is once again open. Please take note though of various closures. See links following this update for maps, full official update etc

silverband-falls

Grampians National Park Recovery Update

  • This morning, VicRoads reinstated access to the Mt Victory-Northern Grampians road from Halls Gap to Mackenzie Falls. Unfortunately beyond Mackenzie Falls (to the west) the road closure will remain in place until next week.
  • Parks Victoria staff have cleared debris off roads and carparks and have now reinstated access to popular visitor sites such as Mackenzie Falls (lookouts only, not to the base), Reeds Lookout and the Balconies, Boroka Lookout and  the Wonderland area – including the Grampians Peaks Trail overnight walk. Water levels remain high in some creeks however and there is a track diversion around Barneys creek, just north of Borough Huts.
  • Other popular visitor sites such as Hollow Mountain, Mt Zero, Flat Rock and Mt Stapylton in the Northern Grampians will also reopen.  There northern section of Mt Zero road is closed however, so access is best from the Western Hwy, Dadswells Bridge and Winfields roads.
  • Access to Plantation campground and Heatherlie Quarry has been reinstated however the Mt Zero Road is closed north of Roses Gap Rd.
  • Mt William and the Major Mitchell Plateau overnight walk will reopen and access is available to the southern Grampians attractions such as Mt Sturgeon, Mt Abrupt and The Piccaninny.
  • Buandik campground, Manja Art shelter, Jardwardjali falls and Billimina art shelter are open in the West of the park, as is the Victoria Range overnight walk. However due to the Victoria Valley being closed, the best access is via Mirranatawa Rd, Jensens Rd , Glenelg River Rd, Henty Hwy and Harrops track.
  • The Mt Difficult Range (between Roses Gap Road and Northern Grampians road remains under a fire recovery closure).

grampians-np-northern-grampians-fire-recovery-update-september-2016

16-sept-park-road-report

grampians-np-roads-open-closed-sept-16-2016

Grampians Update 14th Sept 2016

Received this communication yesterday from the PV team at Halls Gap. As it notes, the park is temporarily closed until further assessments on Friday –

PARKS VICTORIA UPDATE

Parks Victoria would like to advise you that due to heavy rainfall, flooding and minor rock-falls The Grampians National Park is Temporarily Closed (for the next 48 hours).

We are asking local community and visitors to remain out of the park until staff can assess damage and ensure there are no public safety issues.

VicRoads have currently closed the Northern Grampians Road which means access to many popular visitor sites such as Zumsteins, Mackenzie Falls, Reeds Lookout and the Wonderland Range is not available.

There are also many road closures outside the Grampians National Park that are restricting access into the park.

  • Please do not drive past road closure signage – there may be dangerous road washouts behind them
  • Do not drive through flood waters – Creek crossings and floodways may be compromised
  • Road cuttings may continue to deposit large rocks and small mudslides onto roadways
  • With saturated soils, large trees may fall
  • Walking tracks may have fast flowing or impassable creek crossings.
  • Rainfall may continue to fall across the park over the next day or so bringing more issues.

A full report, including important closures or re-openings to visitor sites will be forwarded out  as soon as we can confirm details, but the park closure will remain in place until Friday afternoon at this stage.  

You can also visit the PV website explaining the same thing but with a few pictures

 

http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/about-us/news/parks-affected-by-flooding

 

Easter Updates for the Grampians

Hi all,

For all of you planning an Easter trip to the Grampians, please read below the latest updates. I have also included one that contains everything ie climbing, walks as well as the standard climbing one.  I have had quite a few enquiries about Stapylton Campground. I will provide more information next week but in short, it will be open end of June.

Have a great break everyone, take care whilst climbing and travelling and get some great memories in.

Climbing UpdateMarch 22 2016 GNP Fire Recovery Rocklimbing update sheet 3

MapGrampians-ClosureMap-A4 (2)

Climbing,Walking and Campground UpdateGNP Easter 2016 updates combined all

North Grampians Reopening Update Sept 2015

This update is a more detailed one than the previous one that circulated on Facebook late last week. The update is also available to download.

People – it has been a long time coming, and the recovering areas thank you for your patience. As of the 18th September, most of the climbing areas in the North Grampians still closed, will once again open. These areas though, are still fragile and deserve to have a little extra thought given, if and when you decide to head there. The Mt Difficult Range is still in a very fragile state and because of this, some of the closures here will remain in place, except for those cliffs listed. Check out the list below and please continue to read the care info following it. Thank you all in the climbing and bouldering community who have been understanding of the closures and have been actively promoting it to others. Lots of other areas have seen renewed interest. Whilst Nature will continue to throw these events at us, it is obvious that there are always enough cliffs and boulders to go around.

To aid the long term recovery of the Northern Grampians there is a general closure in place for rock climbing throughout the Mt Difficult Range, except for the main climbing areas stated below. Please support the long term recovery of fire affected areas by remaining out of any closed sites. See closure map for further detail. While Parks Victoria regrets the need to enforce closures, substantial fines will be imposed on those found in any closed, fire affected areas.
Open and accessible rock climbing and bouldering areas in the Northern Grampians
Hollow Mountain Area
Barc Cliff
, Gunn Buttress
, Battlescarred Blocks / The Ammo Shop, Amnesty Wall Area
, Andersens
, Clicke Area (incl. Kindergarten routes) The Kindergarten (bouldering) Expedition Crag, 
Turtle Rocks, 
Sandinista Cliffs, 
Pensioners Wall Area, 
Red Wall Area incl Echoes Block, Loopeys
, Hollow Mountain Cave, 
Legoland, 
Cut Lunch Walls
, Koalasquatsy Wall
Tribute Wall
, The Dungeon, 
Bad Moon Rising Wall
Van Dieman’s Land, Rambla Wall,  A-Frame Boulder

Summerday Valley
Flying Blind. Wall of Fools, Back Wall Bowler Boulder

  • *Note closures are in place to Main wall, Left wall, Bird wall and Calcutti crag and others east of Summerday Valley due to threatened plant species regeneration, cultural heritage protection and trail degradation.Mt Stapylton Amphitheatre
    Northern Wall, Central Buttress, Sabre Gully, 
Grey and Green Walls, Taipan Wall
    Spurt Wall, 
Bouldering Buttress, Lower Taipan, 
Afterglow Wall, Afterglow Boulders
,The Plaza Strip,
The Snake Pit
, Trackside Boulders. Citadel
. Ground Control Caves, Cave Club, 
Between the Sheeps, Spurt Wall (Bouldering), The Titanic (Bouldering)
    Flat Rock Area
    West Flank / Wall of Fuels, Bellepheron Wall
,Epsilon Wall
,Bouldering
    Cloud Cuckoo Land
,
    Note: new access track between flat rock, the kindergarten and Andersons via Bellepheron wall.Mt Zero Area
    Pangaea Walls, Toolondo Waters, 
4 Cornered Crag, 
Mt Zero Summit Cliff, Mount Zero West WallsIskra Crag
    Flower Power Block, Shadow Buttress,  Emu Crag
, Sunstroke Area
, Pigs in Space Buttress, Main West Face, Dolgoruki Wall
    First Tier, 
Second Tier, 
Third Tier
, North Western Outcrop, Eastern Walls
    36 Chambers
, Dolgoruki Wall and Three Tiers

    Asses Ears Area
    Sunset Crags, 
The Secret Crags
, Cherub Wall
, Maul Wall, 
Wallaby Rocks, 
Conifer Wall
, Geranium (Brim) Springs, Porcelain Wall
,Wallaby Rocks
,Joey Blocks

    Pohlner track and Smith Road Area
    The Rust Bucket, Martini Rock, Worship Wall, Point 447 ,Bordel Buttress, Mt Emu
    The Crows Nest, The Eyrie
, The Unnamed Cliff, An Unnamed Cliff, Olive Grove,
    Cave Of Ghosts Cliffs, Ghost Block,
The Olive Cave,
The Ravine

  Mt Stapylton Campground area
Campground Boulders

  • *******************************************

    CLOSED CLIMBING AREAS

    Eastern Mt Difficult Range
    No Mans Land, Heatherlie Heights, Cape Canavera,l Woomera
    The Promised Land / The Pine Plantation, Cliff Lebanon,
The Heavens, 
Lower Heavens,
    Lunar Walls, The Tim Tams

  • North West Mt Difficult Range
    Sickle Wall
, Mawson Slab, 
Mt Difficult Cliff, Epaminondas Buttress, Troopers Creek Cliff, Mt Difficult Summit ,Mt Bloody ImpossibleMt Stapylton Campground
    Cave
, Sentinel Wall
, The Guardhouse,  Warden Wall , Titanic Boulder, Doddery Rock, Mt Pleasant
,The Rockwall Area ,Briggs Bluff AreaNE Mt Zero Range
    Golton Rocks -
Cave Cliff
, Wave Wall (aka The Sundeck) / The Sun Deck  The Sun Gate,
Golton Wall, 
Gog-Magog Crag, 
G-Land, 
Watchmen Wall, 
Coppermine Track Cliff
    *NOTE – The Black Range and Mt Talbot (west of the Grampians) remain closed due to fire.
You can help support sustainable climbing in the Grampians by considering the following:
  • Keep in mind that any damage caused now will remain long term. Stay on designated tracks – any off track walking can impact soil stability and the regeneration of vegetation. Spread of weeds and other pathogens can occur by foot traffic in fragile soils and recovering moss and seed beds. Please don’t create short cuts or new tracks, particularly in steep gullies
  • Only climb in open and accessible areas and keep group numbers low – Avoid taking large groups into small crags or areas where there are no designated tracks
  • Consider other options – There are many climbing and bouldering sites within the Grampians. By giving these fire affected areas some time to recover they will be here to enjoy in the future
  • Think about your safety – tree risk and unstable soils are present across all fire affected areas.
    Please remember your climbing etiquette when in the Grampians National Park:
  • Respect other climbers and park visitors
  • Stick to established tracks and avoid damaging or removing vegetation
  • Many areas have significant Aboriginal cultural sites, please respect this unique cultural landscape by 
only climbing in established areas
  • Avoid excessive chalk and be mindful of cleaning
  • No chipping of rock or new bolting
  • Carry out all rubbish
  • Use toilets provided
  • Other accessible rock climbing areas in and around the Grampians:
  • Victoria Range (Please respect cultural heritage and recovering fire affected areas
  • Mt William Range (Seven Dials area)
  • Serra Range (Including Bundaleer and Mt Rosea)
  • Wonderland Range
  • Mt Arapiles
    For up to date climbing access reports visit http://www.cliffcare.com.au
    For up to date fire recovery information sheets and general park information visit http://www.parks.vic.gov.au phone 13 1963 or call into Brambuk – The National Park and Cultural Centre in Halls Gap, open 9am-5pm daily.
  • The closest camping option in the National Park is Plantation Campground, approximately 10km north of Halls Gap, or private accommodation in the Northern Grampians area.
  • Bush camping in closed fire affected areas is not permitted.

PLEASE NOTE: CAMPGROUND BOULDERS NOTED AS CLOSED IN THE PV UPDATE IS OPEN. THIS OFFICIAL DOCUMENT WILL BE UPDATED SHORTLY.

Sept 2015 Grampians National Park Rock Climbing Update v2

Sept Fire Recovery Map Nth Grampians_010915

Grampians National Park Update Sept 2015 v2