Mt Arapiles Campground Repair Project – Pines Revegetation June 11th, 2017

Saturday 11th June saw approximately 30 volunteers rock up to the Pines campground at Mt Arapiles to plant out 100 young trees and shrubs – 80 of which were grown from seed collected from the area, by Ollie Sherlock. Ollie ran a VCC trip that weekend and recruited helpers from the trip for a couple of hours before they headed out climbing. A number of locals turned up. Louise Shepherd who runs Friends of Arapiles was there to help guide some of the planting and put her digging skills to the harder ground around the Squeeze Test Boulder. This area was also suggested to help reveg the area and provide a barrier to the cars driving in closer. Zoe Wilkinson and colleagues from Parks Victoria were also on hand to welcome everyone and go over safety briefings and planting advice with volunteers. Many thanks to everyone involved. It’s great to see such a fantastic turnout. I like this quote that Ollie used in his trip invite – An old Greek Proverb says it all: “A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.”

Thanks people! More photos in the Smugmug gallery here https://vicclimbingclub-cliffcare.smugmug.com/Access-Environment-at-Climbing/Mt-Arapiles/Revegetation-Pines-Campground-and-Beyond-2/

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Access & Environment report May 2017

Central Gully Repair Project is travelling along nicely. Walter Braun has been at the mount a number of times working by himself or with someone else he has managed to recruit for a day of volunteer work. Cameron Abraham, Steve Monks and Steve Findlay have helped shift rocks via the power barrow. And a cast of thousands helped out on a working bee on 1st April. Awesome turn out and a huge thanks to all who gave up a few hours of their time. This really makes the difference about getting the project finished in a decent time frame. The power barrow can bring the rocks to a certain point on the old track and then humans need to carry the rocks down. Most of the last rock pile at the top had been carried down to the intersection where the new track benching starts. This work day had the volunteers moving the rocks down the new track site so that Walter could start creating the hardening of the track. We are almost ready for a new load of rocks to be delivered – so we can start the process all over again. Stay tuned!

This Saturday 10th June (Queens Birthday long weekend) sees another working bee. This time it’s the revegetation of the Pines campground and beyond. Ollie Sherlock has been doing a brilliant job of growing and nurturing the little treelings from the seed collected at the mount. We will be supplementing these plants with some others sourced from the local nursery. Predominantly in the Pines campground but we also have a number of other sites where we will plant. See the details below and please rock up at 9.00 to give a hand. Those who have already contacted, you will receive a confirmation email shortly.

Fabulous work climbing community! All of this work will last for years to come and help manage the impact that our ever growing numbers have on the sites.

Planned Burn Mt Arapiles 15th May

As noted in a previous post, there are planned burns scheduled for Mt Arapiles. This will be occurring on Monday 15th May. Please note details below – in short Bushrangers Bluff and Campbells Kingdom will be closed and access to other climbing areas will be limited to bottom up only. Acquaint yourself with the specifics in the notes provided by Parks Victoria below.

Parks Victoria Update

Forest Fire Management Victoria (FFMVic) conduct planned burns to reduce the bushfire risk to communities and the environment. Our crews include staff from DELWP, Parks Victoria and Vic Forests and the burning will only go ahead when the weather conditions are suitable.

Two Planned Burns have been been scheduled in Autumn this year for Mount Arapiles – Tooan State Park.

PLANNED BURNS SCHEDULED FOR AUTUMN 2017
Name Location Planned Area (ha)
Arapiles – Summit Road 8KM SW OF NATIMUK 120
Dyrrite – Wanjap 8KM WSW OF NATIMUK 9

Monday 15 May 2017 – Arapiles – Summit Road Planned Burn

On the day of this burn Summit Road into the park will be closed, including vehicular access to walking tracks from Summit Road and the Basin Creek area west of Summit Road.

The following areas are Open:

  •        All climbing areas apart from Bushrangers Bluff and Campbell’s Kingdom (Note – only bottom up access to all open climbing areas as Summit road is closed)
    ·        Natimuk Golf Links Road
    ·        Central Gully Walking Track (bottom up access only with closure at the top)
    ·        Pharos Gully Walking track (bottom up access only with closure at the top)
    ·        Declaration Crag/Taylors Rock
    ·        Mitre Rock
    ·        The Centenary Park campground and picnic area

The following areas are CLOSED to cars and walking access:

  •        The Ring road around Arapiles block
    ·        The Bushranger – Melville Cave
    ·        Campbell’s Kingdom
    ·        The Summit Picnic Area
    ·        The Bluff Lookout and the Fire Tower Lookout
    ·        The bluff lookout unsealed road

Traffic management will be set up in the area and surrounding communities and visitors may see and smell smoke.

Tuesday 16 May 2017 – Dyrrite – Wanjap Planned Burn

No park or road closures are expected on the day but traffic management will be set up in the Mt Arapiles- Centenary Park Campground area and surrounding communities.

Visitors may see and smell smoke.

There are many ways to find out where planned burns are happening in your area. You can sign up online by searching for the Planned Burn Notification System (PBNS), which you can customise to suit your notification needs, or contact the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226.  Alternatively you can contact the Horsham DELWP office on 03 5362 0720.

Map below available for download

Mt-Arapiles-Summit-Rd-burn-closures

Dogs and Cats at the Crag

We love our pets. So much so that we want to take them everywhere. And therein lies the problem. Sometimes that everywhere includes the cliffs you climb at. In Victoria, most of the climbing areas are in National or State Parks. And apart from a few State parks and reserves that will allow leashed dogs, everywhere else is a no go. And no exceptions whatsoever for National Parks. There have been a couple of reports recently of climbers taking dogs and cats on leashes to the Grampians.

Short and sweet – Don’t do it. Politely – Please don’t do it. Below are a few bulleted points as to why these rules are in place. They are in place for everyone from day visitors to overnight campers to climbers. From a climbing community perspective, and from my perspective as someone who deals directly with access issues and land managers, this is not cool. It does influence non climbers and land managers opinions on the climbing community and it doesn’t bode well when I go in to bat for the community about the responsible actions of climbers. It’s also illegal and worth a hefty fine.

There are many reasons as to why it is not appropriate nor allowed, to bring animals into the park. In most cases, dogs have been the pet of choice to bring but it appears that pet cats have now joined the visitor list. Feral cats are a growing problem in the parks with a number of control programs currently being discussed. Their impact on the native wildlife is extensive. Bringing a pet cat into a park can attract feral cats merely through their scent.

  • Animals are not allowed in National Parks to ensure that the park is managed in accordance with its objectives, which is to preserve and protect the natural environment and to conserve flora and fauna.
  • They can compete with or harass, chase, trample or prey upon native fauna, especially ground-dwelling species.
  • They can also disturb wildlife by their scent, sounds, scratching and digging. They may also transmit diseases and parasites to native fauna.
  • Their urine and excrement can attract wild dogs, foxes and feral cats.

Please don’t think that because your animal is on a lead and well behaved that it is an exception to the rule. And understand that by bringing your pet in, you will have influenced someone else to do the same with their beloved pet.

Note: The responsible actions of fellow climbers were to thank for the reports of these incidents. If you do see a doggie or moggie at the cliff, even if the owner is a friend and a generally all around nice person – please let them know it’s not right and to leave the furry family member at home.

Planned Burns – Mt Arapiles & Grampians National Park

Some of these burns may impact your climbing plans. Info below and maps available for download. Register for the planned burn notification system if you want to be kept up to date. Sometimes burns will occur when a perfect weather window appears which doesn’t always give you much notice.

Planned Burns this Autumn at Mt Arapiles. See info below. Dates haven’t been announced yet but as of yesterday, there won’t be any done in the next 7-10 days at least, due to unsuitable weather conditions. Date will be announced when known.

Download here:

1 Fact Sheet_Mt Arapiles_Autumn2017

2 Community Map_Plan Burning Autumn 2017_Mt. Arapiles -Tooan State Park

Planned Burns in the Grampians National Park for this Autumn

Following is info provided:
A number of burns have been scheduled across the Grampians National Park, please see the map attached. These are planned for the Autumn months but FFMVic work closely with the Bureau of Meteorology to assess suitable weather conditions and burning will only go ahead when the weather conditions are suitable. Plans will often change at short notice.

Planned burning in the Grampians National Park is scheduled to take place this year predominately after the Easter School holidays, apart from the Grampians – Jimmy Creek Fuel Reduction Burn which may be actioned earlier to take advantage of favourable conditions. This burn however will result in very few impacts to visitors with no walking track closures, no impacts to visitor sites & limited road closures.

There are many ways to find out where planned burns are happening in your area. You can sign up online by searching for the Planned Burn Notification System (PBNS), which you can customise to suit your notification needs, or contact the VicEmergency Hotline on 1800 226 226.  Alternatively you can contact the Horsham DELWP office on 03 5362 0720.

Prior to any burning, notifications will be sent to land holders and stakeholders in the area.  Burn notification signs will be placed around the park and community engagement staff will be available for questions and feedback from the community.

Should you have any further queries do not hesitate to contact DELWP Horsham on 5362 0720.

Grampians CE Map

Download here:

Grampians CE Map

https://www.ffm.vic.gov.au/bushfire-fuel-and-risk-management/planned-burns/planned-burning-notification-system

Access & Environment Report April 2017

Drones. Love them or hate them. Love them for their ability to provide some amazing video perspectives. And we have all, oohed and aahed over amazing climbing footage. Hate them for – well, there appears to be a variety of reasons as to why people/climbers hate them. The main one seems to be that they are extremely noisy and invasive. And the privacy factor is also high on the scale. A sure fire way to ruin some quiet enjoyment at the cliff . For those of you who have had the opportunity to have a drone hang around you or nearby whilst leading up a route, will more than likely attest to the fact that it’s not something you can ignore. And more than likely attest to the fact that it pissed you off .

Regardless of personal opinions, the reality of drones in parks is becoming more prevalent as they become more affordable for the general public. Which means that the rules on drones and their usage in parks starts to come into play. These rules – which are highlighted in the poster below – have been in place for quite a while but like lots of issues that have rules attached to them (and there are many) they often won’t see the light of day until it becomes…….an issue. And here we are.

Early days yet, but already there have been unpleasant murmurings from some in the climbing community about the use of drones. And from my interaction with various people – not many are aware that in fact, you can’t just buy a drone and go fly it. As opposed to kites. And certainly not go fly it in parks.

So in the interests of good climber discussion, which is always much better than abusive climber discussion – be aware.

For those who have a professional interest, my advice would be to get the permit and make note at the park, via social media etc that you will be fiming and in what general area. Possibly that way, people can organize their climbing for the day and there will be less pissed off people.

I foresee that there will be more discussions on this via land managers, park users and drone operators. If you have something to say about it – drop me a line
cliffcare@vicclimb.org.au

NOTE: THE POSTER BELOW HIGHLIGHTS MT ARAPILES TOOAN STATE PARK BUT THIS IS ALSO INDICATIVE OF ALL NATIONAL /STATE PARKS.

Arapiles DroneUsageSign